Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Tuskegee Airmen - Good To Be Home<br />And Still They Served
Good To Be Home
And Still They Served
Tuskegee Airmen

If you were a Tuskegee Airmen Traveling in the South no matter what your rank, no matter what your military title you were a second class citizen. It didn’t matter what your paid ticket said you had to ride coach or at the back of the bus. No matter how you decried Jim Crow you had to accept it or be jailed for daring to be the man you thought your uniform had made you. No matter how hard you fought Nazism in Europe, Bigotry was the winner back home. Thankfully a brighter day was coming in America and we as a country are blessed to know the Tuskegee Airmen were there to see it.

God Bless America.

-Guy E. Franklin

2018
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Even The Most Stoic of Hearts
Even The Most Stoic of Hearts
Internment

A soldier of 100th Infantry Battalion returns home to his Father.

(2018)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Best Friend Farewell
Best Friend Farewell
Internment

A moral casualty of executive order 9066 and the ensuing incarceration of Japanese Americans.

"No pets of any kind will be permitted”
— U.S. Army, “Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry”

(2018)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Don't Tell My Girl Back Home
Don't Tell My Girl Back Home
Internment

A soldier of the 442nd RCT receives the gratitude of a villager.

(2018)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Broken Shadows
Broken Shadows
Internment

It would be fair to say that of all the people affected by the mandate of executive order # 9066 no group suffered more than the elderly Japanese Americans.

The dignity and property that had been built over a lifetime was suddenly taken as they were now face to face with hysteria and racism. Although the people would eventually be released from their forced

incarceration those in the twilight of their lives had neither the years nor the advantages of youth with which to rebuild.

(2016)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Till Death Do Us Part
Till Death Do Us Part
Internment

“No pets of any kind will be permitted”
— U.S. Army, “Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry”

With little advance notice, owners had to quickly make arrangements for their cats, dogs, birds and other animals. Pets as beloved as a family member were hurriedly deposited with strangers or friends. Many were simply abandoned. These remain the uncounted among the 110,00 who were exiled.

Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - ??? Owakare
??? Owakare
Internment

A womens choral group in Minidoka Relocation Center sing carols to men who are boarding trucks on a cold December en route to a US Army induction center. Despite their incarceration, most Japanese Americans remained intensely loyal to the United States, and many demonstrated their loyalty by volunteering for military service. Of the ten relocation centers, Minidoka had the highest number of volunteers, about 1,000 internees – nearly ten percent of the camp’s total peak population.

(2018)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - The Stigma of Suspected Disloyalty
The Stigma of Suspected Disloyalty
Internment
(2018)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - The Eve Of Deployment
The Eve Of Deployment
Internment

Kumao "Hank" Mano was able to obtain the release of Hana Kikoshima from the Minidoka internment camp, and they were married in 1942. The release stated that Hana would be working for a packing plant in Quincy, WA where Hank's family was already employed.

Hank and his brother Akira "Mike" Mano joined the Army to become the last of the replacements for the 442 Regiment. Prior to his shipment overseas Hank and Hana's daughter Susan was born in Spokane, WA where Hana anxiously awaited his return. Thankfully Hank and his brother Mike survived the war to come home safely. In later years Hank would always diminish his part in the war effort by saying in his characteristic self-effacing way: "I was a replacement", because he was fully aware of the devastating losses suffered by the regiment before his enlistment.

Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - The Enduring Bond
The Enduring Bond
Internment

An American mother and her child, one of 5,918 Japanese American babies born in America's concentration Camps.

(2018)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Tad and Fuji Itami, Minidoka
Tad and Fuji Itami, Minidoka
Internment
(2018)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - First Kiss
First Kiss
Internment
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - The Weeping of the Sakura
The Weeping of the Sakura
Internment
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Gold Star
Gold Star
Internment

More than other internees, the Gold Star Families were subject to a particularly horrific and brutal form of irony. At the same time their loyalty was being questioned, their men were sacrificing their lives as an obligation of their American citizenship. The families had to accept the flag of sacrifice on a barren remote field of an Internment camp far from their home, incarcerated because they were suspected of not being loyal enough to the country their son, husband, brother, or father fought and died for.

(2017)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Amy and the No No Boy
Amy and the No No Boy
Internment

A short story about Jim and Amy Doi their infant daughter Jan, and Tule Lake.

"We were sent to Tule Lake from Minidoka. Upon receiving his letter from President Roosevelt asking him if he would serve his country, Dad wrote back that his "country" and citizenship had been taken away. He therefore, refused to join the armed service. At Tule Lake. Dad was named Chief Construction Foreman to build more barracks, schools and mess halls."

"It was good that he stayed since I was just a little baby under a year old at the time and Mom thought I was going to die in Camp. As it was, she had a good scare when I got violently ill on the spoiled milk we were given and I remember the horrible taste and being sick. Life went on. Upon release Mom and Dad returned to Bothell to discover that the people they entrusted their home and belongings to, sold everything for their own greed. They had to restart with absolutely nothing. The Catholic Church found Dad a position at a lumber mill in Spokane which is where we moved after interment camp. Dad and Mom both worked very hard and saved in order to return to Seattle. Dad worked at the mill and Mom took in sewing alterations and took care of unwed mothers for the church in exchange for the manse they let us stay in." - Jan Doi Gerry

(2016)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - A Study In Contrasts
A Study In Contrasts
Internment

Quote from an unidentified Army officer concerning the round up and evacuation of the folks on Bainbridge Island WA. March, 1942.

"Why these people (the Island Japanese) have completely won us over. Do you know what they did the first day we arrived? They sent four or five of their young people down to help us get acquainted with the Island. They actually helped our men post the evacuation notices. Having to move these people is one of the toughest things this outfit has ever been told to do."

"Personally, I hate the Japanese. And that goes for all of them." - Henry McLemore, syndicated columnist of the Hearst newspapers

The Japanese American evacuation hysteria was "based primarily upon public political pressure rather than upon factual data." - J Edgar Hoover, head of the FBI.

"Their racial characteristics are such that we cannot understand or trust even the citizen Japanese." -Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson

"Who can say I haven't got Japanese blood in me? Who know what kind of blood runs in their veins?"- Ralph Lazo.

This is a race war, as far as the Pacific side of the conflict is concerned ... The White man's civilization has come into conflict with Japanese barbarism ... One of them must be destroyed ... Damn them! Let's get rid of them now! -Mississippi Congressman John Rankin

(2015)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Gaman
Gaman
Internment

A Japanese term of Zen Buddhist origin which means "enduring the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity".

(2017)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Red Flower, The Liberation Of Italy A Japanese American soldier of the 442nd RCT.
"Red Flower, The Liberation Of Italy" A Japanese American soldier of the 442nd RCT.
Internment

“We were given a job to do and we did it.” Humble – Kind - Loyal.

"Blood that has soaked into the sands of a beach is all of one color. America stands unique in the world, the only country not founded on race, but on a way--an ideal." The Japanese American soldier of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team set about to prove their loyalty to this country and, in so doing, saved the lives of hundreds of men, liberated countless villages throughout France and Italy leaving their inhabitants with renewed love and respect for the American Soldier, and brought honor to this country, themselves, and their families. Their lessons in loyalty, humbleness, courage and resolve still resonate in our society today.

(2015)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - We Are The Enemy
We Are The Enemy
Internment

One week after the bombing of Pearl Harbor President Roosevelt delivered a moving address on the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Bill of Rights. He said such inspiring words as "We will not, under any threat or in the face of danger, surrender the guarantees of liberty our forefathers framed for us in our Bill of Rights." It was a little more than two months later that the president signed executive order 9066 setting into motion what has been recognized as the worst violation of constitutional rights in the nation's history.

(2015)
Chris Hopkins - Oil Painter - Internment - Grace Mori
Grace Mori
Internment

Grace Takahashi was 18 years old when she was sent to Manzanar. She was given a position in the camp's mail and files office. Her job was to check the mail and decide which person or department would receive it. She would then hand the mail over to swift-footed messengers who would deliver the mail to the designated parties. Grace said that all of the messengers became doctors and lawyers and such after the war. One of the messengers was Grace's friend Ralph Lazo. Ralph Lazo was the non-Japanese American young man who checked himself into Manzanar to be with his friends. When Ralph was drafted into the army he went back to camp after his military physical instead of returning to his home. He wanted to say goodbye to his friends. He left a box of chocolates on Grace's desk. A rare treat for those incarcerated in Manzanar. In this painting Grace is an inspiring, bright, sharp 90 plus year old woman.

(2015)